Friday, July 18, 2008

Presidential Poll Summary

Every month, I conduct a citizen poll. While these polls are certainly not scientific, I always find the input and feedback to be illuminating (and often, suprisingly reflective of broader trends).

My July poll over the Presidential Election seemed to reflect what we're hearing in the news nationally--that a not insignificant number of Hillary Clinton supporters remain undecided at this point, and many say they will base their decision on how she is incorporated into the Obama effort. (Note: my prior poll showed Democrats split between Obama and Clinton about 50-50).

Overall results:

- it's clear I had more Democratic than Republican respondents, which is reflected in the overall results: Obama received 72.6% of the vote, and McCain receiving 15.1% of the vote. 12.6% were undecided. Four people said they would write in Hillary Clinton, and two will vote for Nader.

For Vice Presidential selections:
- Romney was the top choice for Republicans, with 28.6%; Rob Portman (2nd) received 19%
- Clinton was the top choice for Democrats, with 32.5%; Bill Richardson (2nd) received 13.8%

Undecided voters:
- of undecided voters, 72.2% said they wanted Sen. Clinton as Vice President
- and 52% of the undecided voters said the choice of vice present would "very much" affect their decision in November

Disappointed Primary Voters:

- When Republicans who supported another candidate in the primary were asked if they now support McCain, 64.3% said yes, 35.7% said no.

- When Democrats who supported another candidate in the primary were asked if they now support Obama, 61.8% said yes, 5.5% said no, and 32.7% said it depended on the running mate.

Issues:

- "Jobs and the economy" dominated as the top issue, at 46.8%. "Gas prices/energy policy" came second (12.8%), and "conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan" came third (11.9%).

1 comment:

veteranfem said...

I agree with the 72% of your previous respondents that Hilary Clinton SHOULD be Obama's vice presidential choice.

To not have the benefit of her obvious talents, experience and achievements in the role of vice president would be an insurmountable loss for not only Obama but also for the U.S. and the rest of the world. The measure of his maturity, personally and politically, I believe, will be in whether or not he can understand that and transcend the pettiness of some of his advisers who counsel him otherwise and go beyond his own possible "pique" over some of the campaign enmity that occurred earlier. Here's hoping.

I think that in order to be elected he HAS TO RE-CAPTURE THE NOW DIS-ENCHANTED VOTE OF THE "OLDER WOMEN" (THOSE WOMEN IN HIS DECEASED MOTHER'S AGE RANGE) BY RISING ABOVE PETTINESS AND REALIZING THAT TO WOMEN OF THAT AGE, THE DOOR-OPENERS FOR THE YOUNGER WOMEN WHO NOW SUPPORT HIM, THE STRUGGLES FOR EQUAL RIGHTS IN OUR COUNTRY HAVE BEEN--AND ARE--AS FIERCELY FOUGHT AND FROUGHT WITH AS MUCH AGONY AS THE FIGHT FOR SIMILAR RIGHTS HAVE BEEN FOR THE AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THIS COUNTRY. ALSO, MANY OF THOSE WOMEN (INCLUDING HIS OWN MOM) HAVE FOUGHT AND MANY STILL FIGHT FOR THE RIGHTS THAT AFRICAN AMERICANS NOW ENJOY AND THAT HAVE ALLOWED HIM TO GET AS FAR AS HE HAS GOTTEN IN HIS LIFE.

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